HSLI Newsletter


Serving Illinois Health Information Professionals

Archive for the ‘Professional Development’ Category

(via Nicole Swanson, CARLI)

Registration is open for the newly-added CARLI PDA (Professional Development Alliance) webinar “Motivating & Supporting Employees”. The webinar will take place on Friday, February 25, from 8:00 AM to 12:30 PM CDT. More information is below.

In the last two years, libraries have had to evolve with the changing needs of patrons and the challenges brought on by a global pandemic. It has led to upheavals in organizational structures from retirements, resignations, and new hires. Many library workers are being asked to do more with less and take on multiple roles. How do both management and library workers create an environment that supports mental health?

Sessions will include the following.

  • “Beyond Bubble Baths: Addressing Burnout and Demotivation”, Sarah Steiner, Western Carolina University
  • “Supporting Employees During Hard Times Using Emotional Intelligence (EI)”, Brandy Hamilton, Wake County Public Library
  • “Self-Care 101 for Library Leaders: Managing Stress, Battling Burnout and Vicarious Trauma, and Promoting Mental Health for You and Your Staff”, Dawn Behrend, Lenoir-Rhyne University

To register, please go here.

Posted in Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI), Library Organizations, Professional Development, Webinars | No Comments »

(via Gwen Gregory, Northern Illinois University)

Are you interested in the new understanding of health and indoor space and the library’s role as social infrastructure? Then register for the three-part webinar series Designing the Post-Pandemic Library. Presenters David Vinjamuri and Joe Huberty will guide attendees through the social and behavioral changes of the COVID-19 pandemic and their impact on the design of libraries. Participants will learn a system to analyze the performance of the library and identify areas to improve space utilization.

For more information and to register, please go here. Registering requires having an L2 account. Set up an account here.

Participants need to register for only the first session, and they will then automatically receive registration for the rest. The webinar dates are February 24, March 10, and March 24 (all Thursdays).

Posted in Professional Development, Webinars | No Comments »

(via Dr. Clara Chu, Director and Mortenson Distinguished Professor at Mortenson Center, UIUC Library)

Is your library wanting to build community? Join colleagues from around the world in learning and planning globally to create change locally.

The aim of Engineering Change in Libraries is to understand the Other and mobilize our libraries to provide more effective and equitable services and programs to underserved communities. Inspired by Dr. Agnes Kaposi, a catalyst for change and 31st Annual Mortenson Distinguished Lecture, Engineering Change is organized into two components: (1) the lecture (setting the context) and (2) a two-session workshop for library staff and stakeholders to engineer change in libraries in a process of understanding the Other and planning globally to create change locally.

Speaker

Dr. Agnes Kaposi was born in Hungary in 1932, a year before Hitler came to power. She started school at the outbreak of World War II. Many of her family and friends were murdered in the Holocaust, together with half a million other Hungarian Jews, but a series of miracles and coincidences allowed her to survive. She worked at age 11 as a child laborer in the agricultural and armament camps of Austria and was liberated by a rampaging Soviet Army. She struggled through post-war hardship to re-enter Hungarian society, only to be caught up for a decade in the vice of Stalinism. In 1956, the Hungarian revolution offered the opportunity to escape. Entering Britain as a graduate engineer, she started a family and built a career as a researcher, educator and consultant. She was the third woman to become a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering. She is the author of a recent memoir co-written with historian Laszlo Csosz of University of Budapest, Yellow Star-Red Star (i2i Publications, Manchester). More information on Dr. Agnes Kaposi is available here.

Facilitators

Clara M. Chu (Director and Distinguished Professor, Mortenson Center for International Library Programs, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign)–more information available here
Ajit K. Pyati (Associate Professor, Faculty of Information and Media Studies, University of Western Ontario)–more information available here

Workshops

“Inaugural Workshop on Dislocation”

Tuesday, Februray 15, 8:00-9:30 AM CDT–Session 1 | Tuesday, March 15, 8:00-9:30 AM CDT–open consultation | Tuesday, April 19, 8:00-9:30 AM CDT–Session 2

To register (there is no charge), please go here.

“Workshop on Propaganda”

Tuesday, March 1, 4:00-5:30 PM CDT–Session 1 | Tuesday, April 5, 4:00-5:30 PM CDT–open consultation | Tuesday, May 3, 4:00-5:30 PM CDT–Session 2

To register (there is no charge), please go here.

More information on the series and its content is available here.

Posted in Professional Development, Webinars | No Comments »

(via Esther Grassian, UCLA and Pierce College)

Registration is now open for the next LILi (Lifelong Information Literacy) Show & Tell webinar. Titled “Reimagining Library Spaces and Services to Meet the Needs of Pandemic-Traumatized Faculty and Students”, the webinar will take place from 12:00 to 1:00 PM CDT on Wednesday, February 9. The presenters are Zoia Falevai and Stephanie Robertson. A description and the registration link are below.​

Librarians at the Joseph F. Smith (JFS) Library at BYU-Hawaii are reimagining library services and spaces to address the way our faculty and students have been affected due to the pandemic. We are considering a more holistic approach that encompasses blended learning and mindfulness. Our librarians will come from a place of compassionate listening and flexibility by using strengths-based, student-centered frameworks that re-exam how our library services and spaces can support help-seeking, self-efficacy, and self-regulation after living through what has been a traumatic and disorienting couple of years for students transitioning into face-to-face environments again-many of which are attending college in general for the first time. Plan to come away from this webinar with best practices, affirming discussion, and CC-licensed customizable assignments, resources, and workshop ideas for your library.

For more information, and to register, please go here.

Posted in Professional Development, Webinars | No Comments »

(via Nicole Swanson, CARLI)

Registration is now open for the following CARLI Professional Development Alliance (PDA) webinars taking place in March and early April. See below for descriptions, dates and times, and registration links.​

“Intellectual Freedom and Social Justice: Core Values of Librarianship”

Dr. Emily Knox states: Throughout my work, I argue that intellectual freedom leads to social justice. A quick review of the 2020 American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom’s (2020) Most Challenged Books list demonstrates that the majority of the books on the list are focused on diverse topics including race and gender expression. Without support for intellectual freedom, the voices of people who are marginalized would not be heard. However, the discourse continues to focus on how support for intellectual freedom leads to the proliferation of hate speech and other harmful expression and is against the core value of social justice/social responsibility. I believe this is because the field of library and information science has not sufficiently integrated Kimberle Crenshaw’s (1989) concept of intersectionality into our core philosophical foundations. Crenshaw’s theory of intersectionality argues that individual progress and development, social space, and group identity are all equally important for human flourishing.

Tuesday, March 1, 10:00-11:00 AM CDT

Register here.

“Open Pedagogy in OER Series, Workshop 1: Introducing Open Pedagogy: From Open Resources to Equitable, Student-Centered Practices”

In this workshop Will Cross will introduce open pedagogy, an access-oriented commitment to learner driven education. Just as open educational resources can remove financial barriers for students, open pedagogy empowers faculty and students to build courses that reflect and connect out to the world in which they live. This workshop will introduce the core values of open pedagogy and walk you through successful models for putting open pedagogy into practice. You will leave with a deeper foundation in open pedagogy and be prepared to join us in our follow-up workshop on implementing open pedagogy.

Tuesday, March 8, 2:00-3:00 PM CDT

Register here.

“Open Pedagogy in OER Series, Workshop 2: Implementing Open Pedagogy: Outreach and Advocacy for Developing Faculty Partnerships”

In this workshop we will explore strategies for making open pedagogy work at your institution. Building on the Introducing Open Pedagogy workshop, we will explore strategies for developing a team to support open pedagogy and develop a tailored action plan for connecting with faculty instructors. Because this session is focused on outreach and team building, attendees are encouraged to invite colleagues from across campus including instructional designers, learning technology experts and, of course, faculty instructors. You and your team will leave ready to implement open pedagogy strategies at your institution.

Tuesday, March 15, 2:00-3:00 PM CDT

Register here.

“Learnabout: Chrome Extensions”

Google Chrome web browser can be a valuable tool, especially if you take advantage of extensions. Confused? View this webinar to learn more about Chrome Extensions, how to use them, some of the most productive, and more!

Monday, March 21, 4:00-5:00 PM CDT

Register here.

“Timely Talks with Library Leaders II”

This ASERL Series will give registrants an opportunity to find out what different library leaders are thinking, planning, and strategizing as we navigate through the pandemic.  Topics will include budgets, employee retention/morale, DEI/EDI, and employee connection/communication.

Tuesday, March 22, 1:00-2:30 PM CDT

Register here.

“Navigating Difficult Conversations About Race: Awkward Dinners”

Awkward Dinners are intended to gather small groups of diners in public or private spaces for facilitated discussions on race. They provide an intimate setting in which to express feelings and be heard, and the chance to learn how to disrupt racism in our daily lives.  The “awkward” part comes when participants step outside of their comfort zones to share and learn from diverse perspectives on race. Join us for this interactive webinar where Roni and Ithan will share their success stories and how you can modify these strategies for your organization.  The session will include instructions on how to design, facilitate and evaluate these programs and how to keep the conversations going after the event ends.

Thursday, March 24, 1:00-2:00 PM CDT

Register here.

“CARLI OER Faculty Workshop: Supporting Academic Success: Open Educational Resources and Affordable Course Materials”

The CARLI OER Committee invites institutions to share with their teaching faculty this opportunity to attend a workshop to learn about open educational resources including open textbooks. The workshop will identify the problem are we trying to solve, explain open educational resources including open textbooks and affordable course materials, and provide options for what can we do. After attending, CARLI-member teaching faculty will be invited to write a short review of an open textbook in the Open Textbook Library.

Wednesday, March 30, 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM CDT

Register here.

“The Evolving Library School Curriculum”

In the last few years, library schools have reevaluated their offerings to ensure that a graduate level education aligns with the skills needed for the field. It requires striking a balance between the theories that underpin our profession and what it all looks like in practice. These changes may involve opening up more choices, allowing students to pick specialized tracks. In some cases, it may involve getting rid of some required courses altogether. Panelists from four library schools across the country (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign School of Information Sciences, University of Texas at Austin School of Information, Dominican University School of Information Studies, and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Information and Library Science) will share what they have done to adapt their curriculum and what it means for the future of the profession.

Tuesday, April 5, 1:00-2:30 PM CDT

Register here.

“Learnabout: Google Forms”

Need to create a survey? Registration form? Attendance? Want to create a feedback form? Google forms is an easy-to-use and versatile tool for creating web forms. This webinar will give the basics and some of the more useful features of this tool.

April 11, 4:00-5:00 PM CDT

Register here.

Posted in Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI), Library Organizations, Professional Development, Webinars | No Comments »

(via Nicole Swanson, CARLI)

Registration is now open for the following CARLI Professional Development Alliance (PDA) webinars taking place in February. See below for descriptions, dates and times, and registration links.

“Myths and Truths about Regional Public Universities”

Regional Public Universities (RPUs) educate 20% of all undergraduate students each year and serve as anchor institutions for their regions. As a result of their access and student-centered mission, RPUs generate greater upward mobility than any other postsecondary sector, propelling people to the middle and upper classes. Despite the important role RPUs play in society and for their students, their contributions are often obscured by deficit-based myths and portrayals found in media coverage about the sector, research, and university rankings systems. During this webinar, we will use research and evidence to bust the myths about RPUs while describing their contributions to educational equity, regional wellbeing, and society.

Monday, February 7, 1:00-2:00 PM CDT

Register here.

“Learnabout: Google Sheets”

Spreadsheets can be confusing and complicated. Let us demystify them for you! Join this webinar to learn more about how Google Sheets operates. This session will accommodate beginner and intermediate users.

Monday, February 7, 4:00-5:00 PM CDT

Register here.

“Ph.D. ‘Dropouts’ Part 1”

Every librarian or archivist shaping part of this two-part panel series was formerly enrolled in a Ph.D. program in the pursuit of terminal degrees in a variety of academic disciplines. Each of us has a personal narrative to share about what went right, what went awry, why we left, how we manage our feelings surrounding our departures, and how our thirst for knowledge has ultimately enhanced the information field in which we now labor. If you are an information worker who was once a Ph.D. student or are now or you’re considering becoming one, have a listen.

Wednesday, February 9, 1:00-2:30 PM CDT

Register here.

“A Conversation with DEI Librarians: What We Learned”

Regardless of an institution’s mission, vision, and goals that are used to implement diversity and inclusion initiatives, DEI librarians have one commonality–their roles, responsibilities, and leadership represent what diversity is all about -they are all different. Learn what this task force discovered after interviewing various DEI librarians.

Thursday, February 10, 1:00-2:30 PM CDT

Register here.

“Timely Talks with Library Leaders I”

This ASERL Series will give registrants an opportunity to find out what different library leaders are thinking, planning, and strategizing as we navigate through the pandemic.  Topics will include budgets, employee retention/morale, DEI/EDI, and employee connection/communication.

Tuesday, February 22, 1:00-2:30 PM CDT

Register here.

“Fair Use Gameshow”

Are you interested in fair use, but not interested in long lectures on the topic? Would you like to test your fair use knowledge and have some fun? If the answer to either or both of these questions is yes, then join us as we play the Fair Use Gameshow! Your host, Sara Benson, the Copyright Librarian at the University of Illinois will ask fun, challenging fair use questions to the audience and our panel of esteemed copyright experts will chime in with their opinions. Join the fun as the panel including Melissa Ocepek, Assistant Professor at the iSchool, Pia Hunter, Access Librarian and Online Learning Consultant at the University of Illinois College of Law, and Barbara Kaplan, Faculty Outreach Librarian at the University of Illinois College of Law discuss the many nuances of fair use.

Tuesday, February 22, 6:00-7:00 PM CDT

Register here.

“CARLI OER Faculty Workshop: Supporting Academic Success: Open Educational Resources and Affordable Course Materials”

The CARLI OER Committee invites institutions to share with their teaching faculty this opportunity to attend a workshop to learn about open educational resources including open textbooks. The workshop will identify the problem are we trying to solve, explain open educational resources including open textbooks and affordable course materials, and provide options for what can we do. After attending, CARLI-member teaching faculty will be invited to write a short review of an open textbook in the Open Textbook Library.

Wednesday, February 23, 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM CDT

Register here.

“Libraries as TV / Video Stars”

Hear how the Chattanooga Public Library pivoted from traditional marketing to delight their community with ChattLibrary.TV, a new way to reach their community during the pandemic!  Christina Sacco shares the community’s response and how library staff stepped up their creative juices, as well as some of the exciting new services they see in their future.

Wednesday, February 23, 1:00-2:00 PM CDT

Register here.

Posted in Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI), Library Organizations, Professional Development, Webinars | No Comments »

(via Susan Lessick, University of California – Irvine)

Good news for those interested in learning the right skills to conduct high-quality research. MLA’s Research Training Institute (RTI) has extended the deadline for 2022-23 applicants to Monday, January 31.

RTI transforms library professionals ​with any level of research skills into experts who are able to independently conduct a quality research project. RTI training covers all stages of designing, implementing, and communicating a successful health information research project.
Know anyone who could benefit from this program? Encourage them to apply!

Participants develop effective research questions, select a research design, identify the components of a research project, collect, manage, and analyze data, publish and present the results of a research project, and much more.

Past RTI Fellows report experiencing enhanced career opportunities after participating in the program. Here’s what some of them have said about their RTI experience.

“Participating in the RTI has been like getting a mini-PhD.”

“Excellent instructors, curriculum content, and course readings”

“RTI has helped me approach my research ideas from a place of empowerment instead of apprehension.”

“I now feel confident in my ability to forge forth with a project I’m passionate about.”

“One of the most productive and professional fulfilling milestones of my career.”

For more information, and to apply, please go here.

Posted in Awards, Grants, and Scholarships (non-HSLI), Calls and Requests, Library Organizations, Medical Library Association (MLA), Professional Development | No Comments »

(via Nicole Swanson, CARLI)

The CARLI Preservation Committee is pleased to invite you to join a Professional Development Alliance (PDA) webinar “Working with Fire Professionals”, presented by Chief John High of the Illinois Fire Service Institute (IFSI) on Tuesday, January 25, from 2:00 to 3:00 PM CDT. This program, described fully below, will look at identifying fire hazards, how to prevent them, and how the fire department will respond to the call. This program supports the CARLI Preservation Committee’s efforts to share information throughout 2021-2022 regarding preparing for and responding to Disasters & Emergencies.

“Working with Fire Professionals” is an introduction to what fire departments do with a special look at Fire Prevention activities. The first step in fighting a fire is to prevent the fire from ever occurring.  Firefighters face a variety of hazards as they battle a burning building besides the heat and smoke. There are collapses of ceilings and walls, holes burned through the floors and live electrical and gas lines.

When a fire occurs, the results are often devastating to a family or business. Many items are not replaceable and for a business to be closed due to a fire can be a permanent closure.

People do not always understand how everyday items can help start a fire and how fast a fire can develop. This program will look at identifying fire hazards, how to prevent them, and how the fire department will respond to the call. The fire service goal is to protect life and property.

Chief John High, Sr., serves as the Illinois Fire Service Institute (IFSI) Fire Investigation and Fire Prevention Training program manager. John is responsible for scheduling classes, cultivating new instructors and assuring the program continues to meet all state and national training standards. Chief High also oversees an expansion of the prevention component as part of IFSI outreach.

Chief High joined IFSI field staff in 2003. He has been affiliated since 1994 with the Lynch Fire Protection District and currently serves as a Trustee. He retired from that department as Assistant Chief. Concurrently, Chief High served on the Danville Fire Department beginning in 1978 and retiring in 2012 as Assistant Chief.

Chief High is a member of the International Association of Arson Investigators and the National Fire Protection Association. He attended Parkland College and earned an Associate’s Degree in Fire Science. Chief High holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Fire Management from the Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.

The Illinois Fire Service Institute is the statutory State Fire Academy for Illinois. In addition to training provided at its Champaign campus, the Institute offers one-day hands-on classes for fire departments at Regional Training Centers and local fire stations across the State. The mission of the Illinois Fire Service Institute is to help firefighters do their work through training, education, information and research.

Please register for the event here. Send any questions to CARLI Support, at support@carli.illinois.edu.

Posted in Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI), Library Organizations, Professional Development, Webinars | No Comments »

(via the Network of the National Library of Medicine)

On behalf of the NNLM Reading Club team (Darlene Kaskie, Tess Wilson, Lorin Jackson, Shannon Jones, Stefania Acosta Ramirez and Michele Spatz), we are thrilled to announce the January, 2022, NNLM Reading Club topic, “Health Misinformation”.

We encourage you to learn how to spot health misinformation by reading one of these books and discussing it in your book club. Visit here to get started.

“Health misinformation is a serious threat to public health. It can cause confusion, sow mistrust, harm people’s health, and undermine public health efforts. Limiting the spread of health misinformation is a moral and civic imperative that will require a whole-of-society effort.”–Vivek H. Murthy, M.D., M.B.A. Vice Admiral, U.S. Public Health Service, Surgeon General of the United States

Health misinformation always has an audience–from snake-oil salesmen of ages past to savvy social media health “experts” and “fake news” reports of the present. The pandemic leaves people vulnerable and uncertain. As sophisticated misinformation peddlers take advantage of our 24/7 communications torrent, they make it even harder for people to discern health information fact from fiction.

Critically evaluating health information is a crucial skill in today’s media-driven society. So is understanding the tactics that new-age charlatans use to dupe well-meaning individuals. This month, the NNLM Reading Club suggests three books to help uncover health misinformation – the strategies used to make it believable and the critical thinking skills needed to discover its real character.

In It’s Probably Nothing: The Stress-Less Guide to Dealing with Health Anxiety, Wellness Fads, and Overhyped Headlines, experienced health writer and editor Casey Gueren shares tips to build one’s health literacy–such as learning to flex your BS detector when searching online. Her tone is bright and cheery–a “you got this” approach to becoming smarter health readers.

Director of the Stanford Health Communication Initiative, Emmy-Award winning writer Seema Jasmin, M.D., addresses viral medical myths and why they are so tenacious in her book Viral BS: Medical Myths and Why We Fall for Them. Dr. Yasmin shares the science refuting 46 falsehoods and talks about why such persistent health untruths persist.

The book Hype: A Doctor’s Guide to Medical Myths, Exaggerated Claims and Bad Advice was written by Nina Shapiro, M.D., & collaborator Kristin Loberg. In addition to her clinical practice at UCLA’s Mattel Children’s Hospital, Dr. Shapiro is a noted health writer and commentator. She wrote Hype to “wake [people] up to the truth about popular health advice and offer a thoughtful, reliable guide for becoming a smart health consumer and patient.”

Posted in National Library of Medicine (NLM), Professional Development | No Comments »

(via the National Library of Medicine)

The National Library of Medicine seeks recent graduates, including early- and second-career librarians, interested in advancing equitable and innovative futures for biomedical libraries to participate in a one-year fellowship that fosters the development of aspiring library leaders.

Position(s): National Library of Medicine Associate Fellows

Fellows will:

  • ​select and participate on projects ranging from o​perations to research and development; project opportunities are in data science, data management, open science, public access, vocabularies and ontologies, common data elements
  • grow professionally and learn in a cohort, participating in an established set of workshops
  • develop skills in data science, foundations for leadership
  • receive support from experienced mentors
  • attend professional conferences

The NLM Associate Fellowship Program offers a series of workshops in library operations, research and development, intramural and extramural research, development, and lifecycle of the NLM web-based products and services, and the extensive engagement and education program. In the second half of the year, Associate Fellows choose projects based on real-world problems proposed by library divisions and work with NLM staff over a six-month period. Successful projects have led to peer-review publications and to services that have become a regular part of the services and product of the National Li​brary of Medicine.

How many: between 3 and 6 Associate Fellows selected each year

Fellowship: one-year to learn about the National Library of Medicine, its products and services

Where: National Library of Medicine, campus of the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The Fellowship may be virtual in 2022-2023.

When: July 1, 2022 – June 30, 2023

Stipend: $60,129; additional financial support for the purchase of health insurance; up to $1,500 in relocation funding

Eligibility: recent graduate (within the past five years) with a master’s in information science/library science

Deadline for applications: Friday, January 28, 2022

Apply online here. Applications and additional information are available online at “Associate Fellowship Program: How to Apply”.

Contact information: Kathel Dunn, Associate Fellowship Program Coordinator, at 301-827-4284 or kathel.dunn@nih.gov

Who is eligible?

All U.S. citizens who will have earned an MLS or equivalent degree in library/information science from an ALA-accredited school by June 2022. Both recent graduates and librarians early in their career are welcome to apply.

The National Library of Medicine is located on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, just outside of Washington, DC. NLM is committed to recruiting and developing a workforce that is inclusive of a broad range of underrepresented people, including racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and individuals from economically or educationally disadvantaged backgrounds. NLM’s commitment to workforce diversity extends to advocating for diversity of thought and plurality of methods. A commitment to diversity is grounded in the belief that full participation of a diverse workforce improves team performance, engendering robust array of knowledge representations as well as culturally appropriate means of supporting discovery and delivering health information.

Posted in Awards, Grants, and Scholarships (non-HSLI), Calls and Requests, National Library of Medicine (NLM), Professional Development | No Comments »