HSLI Newsletter


Serving Illinois Health Information Professionals

Archive for the ‘National Library of Medicine (NLM)’ Category

(via the Network of the National Library of Medicine)

Registration is now open for the NNLM webinar “Grants and Proposal Writing”. It will take place on Thursday, February 10, from 1:00 to 2:00 PM CDT. This live webinar is worth 1.00 hour of MLA CE credit. A description and the link to registration are below.

Designed for beginning grant proposal writers, this class presents a general overview of grant and funding processes, as well as the level of detail required for a successful proposal. Each component of the grant writing process will be addresse​d, including: documenting the need; identifying the target population; writing measurable objectives; developing a work plan, an evaluation plan and dissemination plan.

At the end of the session, participants will be able to complete the following tasks.

1. Identify online resources to search for funding
2. Describe the basic sections of a proposal
3. Identify types of documents necessary to include with a proposal
4. Recognize common mistakes of proposal writers

For more information, and to register, please go here. Registering requires having an NNLM user account. To create one, please go here.

Posted in Awards, Grants, and Scholarships (non-HSLI), Continuing Education, Library Organizations, Medical Library Association (MLA), National Library of Medicine (NLM), Webinars | No Comments »

(via the Network of the National Library of Medicine)

On behalf of the NNLM Reading Club team (Darlene Kaskie, Tess Wilson, Lorin Jackson, Shannon Jones, Stefania Acosta Ramirez and Michele Spatz), we are thrilled to announce the January, 2022, NNLM Reading Club topic, “Health Misinformation”.

We encourage you to learn how to spot health misinformation by reading one of these books and discussing it in your book club. Visit here to get started.

“Health misinformation is a serious threat to public health. It can cause confusion, sow mistrust, harm people’s health, and undermine public health efforts. Limiting the spread of health misinformation is a moral and civic imperative that will require a whole-of-society effort.”–Vivek H. Murthy, M.D., M.B.A. Vice Admiral, U.S. Public Health Service, Surgeon General of the United States

Health misinformation always has an audience–from snake-oil salesmen of ages past to savvy social media health “experts” and “fake news” reports of the present. The pandemic leaves people vulnerable and uncertain. As sophisticated misinformation peddlers take advantage of our 24/7 communications torrent, they make it even harder for people to discern health information fact from fiction.

Critically evaluating health information is a crucial skill in today’s media-driven society. So is understanding the tactics that new-age charlatans use to dupe well-meaning individuals. This month, the NNLM Reading Club suggests three books to help uncover health misinformation – the strategies used to make it believable and the critical thinking skills needed to discover its real character.

In It’s Probably Nothing: The Stress-Less Guide to Dealing with Health Anxiety, Wellness Fads, and Overhyped Headlines, experienced health writer and editor Casey Gueren shares tips to build one’s health literacy–such as learning to flex your BS detector when searching online. Her tone is bright and cheery–a “you got this” approach to becoming smarter health readers.

Director of the Stanford Health Communication Initiative, Emmy-Award winning writer Seema Jasmin, M.D., addresses viral medical myths and why they are so tenacious in her book Viral BS: Medical Myths and Why We Fall for Them. Dr. Yasmin shares the science refuting 46 falsehoods and talks about why such persistent health untruths persist.

The book Hype: A Doctor’s Guide to Medical Myths, Exaggerated Claims and Bad Advice was written by Nina Shapiro, M.D., & collaborator Kristin Loberg. In addition to her clinical practice at UCLA’s Mattel Children’s Hospital, Dr. Shapiro is a noted health writer and commentator. She wrote Hype to “wake [people] up to the truth about popular health advice and offer a thoughtful, reliable guide for becoming a smart health consumer and patient.”

Posted in National Library of Medicine (NLM), Professional Development | No Comments »

(via the National Library of Medicine)

The National Library of Medicine seeks recent graduates, including early- and second-career librarians, interested in advancing equitable and innovative futures for biomedical libraries to participate in a one-year fellowship that fosters the development of aspiring library leaders.

Position(s): National Library of Medicine Associate Fellows

Fellows will:

  • ​select and participate on projects ranging from o​perations to research and development; project opportunities are in data science, data management, open science, public access, vocabularies and ontologies, common data elements
  • grow professionally and learn in a cohort, participating in an established set of workshops
  • develop skills in data science, foundations for leadership
  • receive support from experienced mentors
  • attend professional conferences

The NLM Associate Fellowship Program offers a series of workshops in library operations, research and development, intramural and extramural research, development, and lifecycle of the NLM web-based products and services, and the extensive engagement and education program. In the second half of the year, Associate Fellows choose projects based on real-world problems proposed by library divisions and work with NLM staff over a six-month period. Successful projects have led to peer-review publications and to services that have become a regular part of the services and product of the National Li​brary of Medicine.

How many: between 3 and 6 Associate Fellows selected each year

Fellowship: one-year to learn about the National Library of Medicine, its products and services

Where: National Library of Medicine, campus of the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The Fellowship may be virtual in 2022-2023.

When: July 1, 2022 – June 30, 2023

Stipend: $60,129; additional financial support for the purchase of health insurance; up to $1,500 in relocation funding

Eligibility: recent graduate (within the past five years) with a master’s in information science/library science

Deadline for applications: Friday, January 28, 2022

Apply online here. Applications and additional information are available online at “Associate Fellowship Program: How to Apply”.

Contact information: Kathel Dunn, Associate Fellowship Program Coordinator, at 301-827-4284 or kathel.dunn@nih.gov

Who is eligible?

All U.S. citizens who will have earned an MLS or equivalent degree in library/information science from an ALA-accredited school by June 2022. Both recent graduates and librarians early in their career are welcome to apply.

The National Library of Medicine is located on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, just outside of Washington, DC. NLM is committed to recruiting and developing a workforce that is inclusive of a broad range of underrepresented people, including racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and individuals from economically or educationally disadvantaged backgrounds. NLM’s commitment to workforce diversity extends to advocating for diversity of thought and plurality of methods. A commitment to diversity is grounded in the belief that full participation of a diverse workforce improves team performance, engendering robust array of knowledge representations as well as culturally appropriate means of supporting discovery and delivering health information.

Posted in Awards, Grants, and Scholarships (non-HSLI), Calls and Requests, National Library of Medicine (NLM), Professional Development | No Comments »

(via Nicole Contaxis, New York University Langone Health)

Please join the virtual kickoff for the new National Center for Data Services (NCDS) of the Network of the National Library of Medicine, on Thursday, January 6, at 12:00 PM CDT.

Come hear about our upcoming exciting offerings, including courses in research data management, data science, and data ethics, and a series of webinars on the upcoming NIH Data Management and Sharing requirements. We look forward to the opportunity to introduce ourselves, to answer your questions, and to hear what you would like to see from the NCDS!

For more information, and to register, please go here. Note that this event does not carry any CE credit. Also, an NNLM account is required to participate. To create one, go here.

Posted in National Library of Medicine (NLM), Webinars | No Comments »

(via the Network of the National Library of Medicine)

Registration is now open for the NNLM 2022 MeSH Highlights Webinar. It will take place on Wednesday, January 12, from 12:00 to 1:00 PM. The course is worth 1.00 hour of CE credit. More information is below.

Every year, updates are made to MeSH, the NLM controlled-vocabulary thesaurus used for indexing articles for PubMed and for cataloging books and other resources. This annual webinar aims to introduce those changes and provide examples of how the changes may affect you as a PubMed searcher.

For more information about MeSH, see the MeSH homepage.

Upon completing the webinar, participants will be able to accomplish the following tasks.

1. List some new or updated MeSH terms, such as terms related to COVID-19.
2. Describe any structural changes to MeSH for 2022.
3. Find detailed information about MeSH and PubMed and other helpful resources on the NLM website.

​For more information, and to register, please go here. To register, one must have an NNLM account. Set up an account here.

Posted in Continuing Education, National Library of Medicine (NLM), Webinars | No Comments »

(via the Network of the National Library of Medicine)

Registration is now open for the free NNLM CE “Data Literacy for the Busy Librarian”. This self-paced class runs from Monday, February 14, to Monday, February 28. The course is worth 4 MLA CE credits.

​The class looks at foundational data-management skills, with an emphasis on key topics relating to Data Management Plans (DMPs). These topics include understanding standards and metadata in a biomedical context, identifying appropriate biomedical data repositories, understanding data sharing and data citation, and knowing and applying best practices in data visualization.

​For more information, and to register, please go here. Note that having an NNLM account is required to register. To create an account, go here.

Posted in Continuing Education, Library Organizations, Medical Library Association (MLA), National Library of Medicine (NLM), Webinars | No Comments »

(via Sarah Wade, Campbell University)

Registration is open for the free NNLM (Network of the National Library of Medicine) CE class “Elder Justice Explained: What It Is and How You Can Help​”. It will take place on Wednesday, January 19, from 1:00 to 2:00 PM CDT. This program is part of the NNLM Region 1 Insights Webinar Series. To register, please go here. More information is below.

Description

This webinar will focus on “elder justice”, also known as the prevention of elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation. You will learn about the roots of the elder justice movement, how it affects the lives of older adults, federal policies to address and prevent elder abuse and neglect, and ways you can get involved in advocating for these policies and preventing elder abuse in your community.

Presenter Bios.

Bob Blancato is the National Coordinator of the bipartisan 3000-member Elder Justice Coalition. He is the President of Matz, Blancato and Associates, located in Washington, D.C. Bob has long been recognized as a national advocate with policy expertise on behalf of older adults. In 2019, he was invited by both the Senate Finance Committee and House Ways and Means Committee to testify on a range of issues, including elder justice. Bob holds a BA from Georgetown University and an MPA from American University. He has won numerous awards for advocacy, most recently the American Society for Aging’s ASA Hall of Fame Award in March 2020.

Meredith Whitmire is the Policy Director of the Elder Justice Coalition. She is also the Vice President of Matz, Blancato and Associates and the Policy and Advocacy Director for the National Association of Nutrition and Aging Services Programs (NANASP). In these roles, she provides policy analysis and direction for and advocates on behalf of a wide variety of aging topics, including nutrition, elder justice, and community-based services. She holds a JD from Georgetown University Law Center and a BA from Georgetown University.

Objectives

  • ​Understand what elder justice is and how abuse, neglect and exploitation affect the lives of older people
  • Learn about the roots of the elder justice movement and how it impacts the lives of older people
  • Identify federal policies to address and prevent elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation
  • Take away resources to use and share about elder justice and ways to get involved as advocates
Posted in Continuing Education, Library Organizations, National Library of Medicine (NLM), Webinars | No Comments »

(via the Network of the National Library of Medicine)

This Wednesday, December 1, NNLM will be opening up “Genetics 101” in Moodle. The class is scheduled from Wednesday, December 1, to Wednesday, December 15, and it is worth 4 CE credits. You can proceed at your own pace, but all work is due on Wednesday, December 15.

This is a free “beginner” level genetics class.

Objectives

1. Develop an introductory understanding of key terms, concepts, and applications of human genetics
2. Identify and describe the parts of the “central dogma of molecular biology” (i.e. DNA, transcription (i.e. mRNA), and translation (i.e. protein)
3. Explain the anatomy of a “gene”

For more information, and to register, please go here. An NNLM user account is required to register.

Posted in Continuing Education, National Library of Medicine (NLM), Webinars | No Comments »

(via Sarah Wade, Campbell University)

The Network of the National Library of Medicine Region 3 is pleased to invite you to their next edition of Health Bytes with Region 3, a monthly web conference on various topics of interest to health sciences librarians and others. On Wednesday, October 13, from 10:00 to 11:00 AM CDT, we are thrilled to welcome social media medical educator, health equity champion, and third-year medical student Joel Bervell from Washington State University to present “New Media, New Advocacy: How Racial Bias Is Being Tackled In Medicine”.

To learn more about the session and register, please go here. (To register, one will need to set up an account with NNLM first.) This webinar is eligible for 1 MLA CE credit and 1 CHES/MCHES CE credit.

All of Region 3’s upcoming sessions are posted on the NNLM training calendar.

Posted in National Library of Medicine (NLM), Webinars | No Comments »
(via Evelyn Cunico)

The National Library of Medicine has posted the following Medical History exhibition. So, What’s New in the Past?: The Multiple Meanings of Medical History explores how the history of medicine has told different stories and different truths over time depending on the questions asked and concerns raised. A 1997 collaboration between Elizabeth Fee, who was newly appointed chief of the History of Medicine Division and historian of medicine Ted Brown, the National Library of Medicine, featured the exhibition in the lobby of the building lobby July 7, 1997- September 30, 1997.

In 2004, Young Rhee and Roxanne Beatty, staff of the History of Medicine Division, adapted the script and images of the assets that were on display in 1997 to an online exhibition. In 2021, the Exhibition Program refreshed the earlier online exhibition.

To view the latest version of the exhibition, please go here.

Posted in Exhibits, National Library of Medicine (NLM) | No Comments »