Health Science Librarians of Ilinois

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Archive for the ‘Scholarly Publishing’ Category

(via Laura Gariepy, Virginia Commonwealth University)

FREE Online Presentation

Raise Your Voice: Increasing Diversity and Inclusion by Participating in Scholarly Peer Review
Presented online via Zoom
Tuesday, September 10, 2019 1pm – 2pm Central Time Sponsored by the ACRL ULS Professional Development Committee Register here

Scholarly publishing needs input from diverse voices to ensure both quality and equity. Let an experienced peer reviewer for more than 10 LIS journals show you how scholarly peer review can benefit you, your peers, and the profession as a whole. You will leave this session with a better understanding of the peer review process, how participation in peer review can increase diversity and inclusion in our discipline’s scholarship, the characteristics of a constructive peer review, steps to begin participating as a reviewer, and some hands-on practice in thoughtful, respectful, and constructive peer criticism.

Erin Owens is the Access Services Coordinator and Scholarly Communications Librarian at Sam Houston State University, where she has been a member of the library faculty, in varying roles, for 12 years. She has ten years of experience in publishing original research in peer-reviewed journals, and six years of experience in serving as a peer reviewer for more than 10 different journals in Library and Information Science, including serving on editorial and peer review boards for several journals. She is currently a member of the Editorial Board for College & Research Libraries (ACRL).

This free presentation is sponsored by the ACRL University Libraries Section Professional Development Committee. It will take place on Tuesday, September 10th, 2019 from 1pm to 2pm Central time. Register here: https://ala-events.zoom.us/webinar/register/1f22a415b34800b3cde7dc3c8da9331e

If you can’t make this session but wish to view a recording later, please register so that you’ll receive an email that includes a link to the video of the presentation.

Please direct questions and concerns to Laura Gariepy (lwgariepy@vcu.edu), Chair of the ACRL ULS Professional Development Committee. A full list of the committee’s past and future programs are available here.

Posted in Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), Calls and Requests, Library Organizations, Scholarly Publishing, Webinars | No Comments »

(via Brian Lym, Hunter College)

Chapter proposals are requested for an edited volume titled Implementing Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Handbook for Academic Libraries, to be published by the Association of College and Research Libraries.  Head Editors are Brian Lym (Hunter College) and Corliss Lee (University of California, Berkeley), and Co-Editors are Tatiana Bryant (Adelphi University), Jonathan Cain (University of Oregon), and Kenneth Schlesinger (Lehman College).

We are seeking case studies, qualitative research studies, quantitative research studies, survey research studies, and other research-based solutions that can be implemented in today’s libraries.  A more detailed outline appears
below.

Proposals, including a 600-800 word abstract, should be submitted by August 19, 2019.  Notification of acceptance will occur by the end of September 2019. Selected authors should expect to submit a full draft of their article no later than January 14, 2020.

Call for Proposals:
https://tinyurl.com/yyefwazv

Send questions to Head Editors Brian Lym (blym@hunter.cuny.edu) and Corliss Lee (clee@library.berkeley.edu).

Posted in Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), Calls and Requests, Library Organizations, Scholarly Publishing | No Comments »

(via Elizabeth Clarage, CARLI, on behalf of The Library Publishing Coalition Directory Committee)

Does your library publish journals, monographs, conference proceedings, or technical reports? Do you provide hosting and support services for digital humanities projects, data, or ETDs? Help us to document the range of activities that libraries are undertaking in “publishing” (broadly defined) through their work in scholarly communications, digital humanities, digital sciences, and institutional repositories.

To promote collaboration and knowledge-sharing, and to raise the visibility of the unique contributions of libraries as publishers, the Library Publishing Coalition (LPC) is compiling its sixth edition of the Library Publishing Directory.

To have a profile of your library included in the Directory, please complete our questionnaire at:

https://librarypublishing.org/lpdq-2020/

The call for entries will close on August 23. 

The questionnaire takes between 30 and 45 minutes to complete. You can save your progress and return later, but we recommend previewing the questions before you begin. If your library has had an entry in a previous edition of the Directory, you should have received an email with instructions on how to update it. Email contact@librarypublishing.orgwith questions.

About the Directory

The Library Publishing Directory is an important tool for libraries wishing to learn about this emerging field, connect with their peers, and align their practices with those of the broader community. Last year’s edition featured 138 libraries in almost a dozen nations.

The Directory is published openly on the web and will include contact information, descriptions, and other key facts about each library’s publishing services. The Directory is published openly online in PDF, EPUB, and database versions. The 2020 edition will be published in early 2020.

The Directory is made possible by the generous donation of services from Purdue University Libraries and Bookmasters.

Please e-mail contact@librarypublishing.org with questions or comments. We look forward to hearing from you.

Posted in Calls and Requests, Scholarly Publishing | No Comments »

(via Carol Wittig, University of Richmond)

Chapters are sought for the forthcoming ACRL book Teaching About “Fake News”: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences.

The problem of “fake news” has captured the attention of administrators and instructors, resulting in a rising demand for librarians to help students learn how to find and evaluate news sources.  But we know that the phrase “fake news” is applied broadly, used to describe a myriad of media literacy issues such as misinformation, disinformation, propaganda, and hoaxes. There’s no way we can teach everything there is to know about “fake news” in a 50-minute one-shot library session.  What we can do is tailor our sessions to be relevant to the specific audience. For example, a psychology class may benefit from a session about cognitive biases, while an IT class might want to talk about the non-neutrality of algorithms.  Special populations such as non-traditional students or writing center tutors could also be considered.

Although the chapter may include how you teach the topic, the emphasis should be on the “why” behind fake news.  Why is it so prevalent? Why do people believe it?  Why does it matter? Successful proposals will select one narrow reason and explore it in-depth. The heart of the chapter should explore a particular issue; this is not intended to be an activity cookbook.

Chapter structure:

Each chapter of this book will be designated for a specific audience, discipline, or perspective, and be written by an author with expertise in that area.  In order to provide a foundation for the teaching librarian, it will discuss that specific aspect of fake news and be grounded in the established scholarship.  Next it will include a brief annotated list of accessible readings that could be assigned to participants ahead of a workshop when appropriate.  Authors will be asked to house a student-friendly PowerPoint version of their chapter in the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy Sandbox; the teaching librarian could use it as-is or modify it for the direct instruction portion of a session.  Finally, each chapter will include hands-on activities and discussion prompts that could be used in the actual workshop.

Final chapters will be 2,000-3,000 words in length.

Example chapter summary:

A chapter about the Facebook Cambridge Analytica scandal would explore the scandal, written so that the teaching librarian would feel she had a good grasp of it.  She could then use the student-friendly PPT in her one-shot workshop, and use the provided active learning exercise.

Submission due dates:

Submit proposals at: https://forms.gle/FCPwykZuppDXCDFa9  by July 31,  2019

Notifications will be sent by September 1, 2019

Final chapters will be due by December 1, 2019

Possible chapter topics:

These are just examples of disciplines and audiences; we are open to others!

1.       Lessons by discipline

a.       Psychology

b.       Journalism/Communication

c.       History

d.       Information Technology

e.       Sociology

f.        Health Sciences

g.       Rhetoric/Composition

h.       Political Science

i.         Philosophy

j.         Business

2.       Lessons by audience

a.       Writing Center

b.       Senior Citizen groups

c.       Professors

Proposal information:

Authors should complete the following form to submit proposals: https://forms.gle/FCPwykZuppDXCDFa9

Proposals will include:

  1. Discipline or audience addressed
  2. 100 word abstract of proposed chapter
  3. A sample learning activity

Email teachingaboutfakenews@gmail.com with any questions.

Editors:

Candice Benjes-Small, Head of Research, and Mary K. Oberlies, Research and Instruction Librarian, William & Mary; Carol Wittig, Head of Research and Instruction, University of Richmond

Posted in Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), Calls and Requests, Library Organizations, Scholarly Publishing | No Comments »

(via Derek Marshall, Mississippi State University)

The editor of the Technology column in Public Services Quarterly is seeking a guest column author for future issues. The next submission deadline is August 16, 2019.

The purpose of the Technology column is to examine current and developing technology topics in academic libraries. The column’s focus is creative uses of technology, introductions to new technologies, and critiques of current technologies, their uses, or their future.

Readers interested in contributing ideas or articles to this column may contact column editor Derek Marshall at dmarshall@library.msstate.edu.

Posted in Calls and Requests, Scholarly Publishing | No Comments »

College & Research Libraries News Seeking Cover Art

(via ACRL)

C&RL News is looking for images from library collections to feature on upcoming covers. If you have items in your collections that you think would make attractive C&RL News covers, we would love to see them. To submit images (or image collections), send URLs for Web-based images or images directly as attachments to David Free at dfree@ala.org<mailto:dfree@ala.org>. Please include a brief description of the item and your collection. Images selected to appear as C&RL News covers will require a high-resolution electronic image (300 dpi or higher) to be submitted prior to the publication date. Complete guidelines for the submission of cover illustrations are available on the C&RL News website <http://ala.informz.net/z/cjUucD9taT04NjY2NzUzJnA9MSZ1PTEwMjMxNTgxNTYmbGk9Njc3NDI4MTg/index.html>.

Posted in Calls and Requests, Illinois Association of College and Research Libraries (IACRL), Library Organizations, Scholarly Publishing | No Comments »

(via Dr. Tim Schlak, Robert Morris University)

Call for abstracts for 2020 themed issue of New Review of Academic Librarianship: “Involving the community – engaging students in taking academic libraries forward”

For the first time ever, the New Review of Academic Librarianship has Guest Editors from two different countries overseeing the annual themed issue. Olaf Eigenbrodt (Germany) and Karen Latimer (Northern Ireland) are working jointly on the 2020 themed issue which will bring together papers from across the world on student engagement and academic libraries. The themed issue will focus on developments in student engagement for organisational change as well as services, infrastructures, and spaces.

The deadline for submitting abstracts for consideration will be the 5th August 2019. More information on the topic, process and focus can be accessed from the journal’s web site.  If you need any further information, contact Olaf Eigenbrodt olaf.eigenbrodt@sub.uni-hamburg.de

Dr Graham Walton BSc MA MBA PhD

Posted in Calls and Requests, Scholarly Publishing | No Comments »

(via Kristina Clement, University of Wyoming)

The International Journal of Open Educational Resources (IJOER) will be hosting a fall/winter special issue on Open Education Resources & Libraries. This issue will be hosted by featured guest editors Samantha Cook and Kristina Clement of the University of Wyoming Libraries. This special issue of the International Journal of Open Educational Resources (IJOER) will focus on librarians, libraries, and Open Educational Resources. Papers may draw from any of the following topics, though authors are encouraged to elaborate on these ideas. This list is meant to be broad, general, and to get your creative juices flowing! If you have another topic of interest that you would like to write about that is not listed here, please send the editors a brief message with your thoughts and ideas. 

Topics of Interest

OER Collaborations between Librarians and Faculty

Incorporating Open practices and Open Educational Resources in library instruction

OER grant programs and/or partnerships

Open Educational Processes

OER Platforms

Copyright and OER

Assessment of OER and/or OER Grant programs

OER and accessibility

Library support for OER

OER and open pedagogy

OER and institutional repositories

OER and digital scholarship/digital humanities

OER best practices

OER and collection development

Demonstrating the value of OER

Submitting a Paper Proposal

Paper proposals should be submitted via google form

 with all author information, an abstract of no more than 500 words describing your proposed article, and up to five keywords.

Paper proposals are accepted on a rolling basis until July 3, 2019. Accepted paper proposals will be invited to submit full articles for peer review.

 

Full link to the paper proposal submission form: https://forms.gle/SioYfKMzU8USUoPe7

 

Publication Schedule

Paper Proposal due by July 3rd

Full Papers due by August 7th

Peer Review comments returned by September 16th

Final revised papers due October 25th

 

Journal Information

The aim of The International Journal of Open Educational Resources (IJOER) is to provide a venue for the publication of quality academic research with an emphasis on representing Open Educational Resources in teaching, learning, scholarship, and policy. The International Journal of Open Educational Resources is a bi-annual, open access, double-blind peer-reviewed academic publication sponsored by theAmerican Public University System (APUS) and the Policy Studies Organization.

 

Featured Guest Editors

Samantha Cook, Instructional Design Librarian, scook13@uwyo.edu

Kristina Clement, Student Success Librarian, kclemen8@uwyo.edu

University of Wyoming Libraries

Posted in Calls and Requests, Open Access, Scholarly Publishing | No Comments »

(via Brian Lym–Hunter College, City University of New York)

Call for Chapter Proposals

Implementing Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Handbook for Academic Libraries

Chapter proposals are requested for an edited volume titled Implementing Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Handbook for Academic Libraries, to be published by the Association of College and Research Libraries. Head editors are Brian Lym (Hunter College) and Corliss Lee (University of California, Berkeley), and co-editors are Jonathan Cain (University of Oregon), Tatiana Bryant (Adelphi University), and Kenneth Schlesinger (Lehman College).

We are seeking case studies, qualitative research studies, quantitative research studies, survey research studies, and other research-based solutions that can be implemented in today’s libraries. A more detailed outline appears below.

Proposals, including a 600-800 word abstract, should be submitted https://tinyurl.com/yyefwazv by August 19, 2019.  Notification of acceptance will occur by the end of September 2019.  Selected authors should expect to submit a full draft of their article no later than January 14, 2020.

Send questions to head editors Brian Lym (blym@hunter.cuny.edu) and Corliss Lee (clee@library.berkeley.edu).

Book Outline

The well-documented lack of diversity in the academic library workforce remains problematic, especially given growing expectations that the overall academic workforce be more representative of the increasingly diverse student bodies at our colleges and universities. That the lack of diversity is especially notable among the professional ranks (librarians, library leadership, and administrators) is indicative of inequity of opportunities for people of color and “minoritized” ethnic groups.  Further, remediation of racial and ethnic diversity in the academic library workplace raises broader diversity issues, including individuals with identities outside the gender binary and other individuals who face discrimination due to their sexual orientation, disabilities, religious affiliation, military status, age, or other identities.

Emerging efforts to diversify the academic library workplace are pointedly raising issues of inclusion in libraries where demographic homogeneity has historically prevailed. With Implementing Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, we hope to capture emerging research and practice that demonstrates ways academic libraries and librarians can work with and within their institutions to create a more equitable and representative workforce.

Part 1:  Leveraging and Deploying Systemic and Bureaucratic/Structural Solutions Since colleges and universities are hierarchical and complex systems with centralized and bureaucratic controls that can effect or impede transformative change, academic library leaders need to leverage and deploy formal structures and administrative resources to achieve DEI excellence.

Themes:

Recruitment and Hiring

Retention and Advancement

Professional Development and Support

Assessment: Tracking DEI Progress

Part II:  Leveraging Collegial Networks, Politics, and Symbols:

Strengthening and Deepening Change for DEI Excellence Acknowledging and deploying collegial networks, leveraging informal and formal political power, and symbolic resources to foster diversity, equity, and inclusion excellence in academic libraries.

Themes:

Navigating Collegial Networks and Normative Expectations Leveraging the Politics of Organizational Behavior (formal and informal power) Reinforcing the Message:  Deploying Change Through Deployment of Symbolic Activities

Posted in Calls and Requests, Scholarly Publishing | No Comments »

(via Lisa Romero, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Behavioral & Social Sciences Librarian is now accepting manuscript submissions for volume 36:3. The submission deadline is August 16, 2019.

B&SS Librarian is a peer-reviewed, quarterly journal focusing on all aspects of behavioral and social sciences information with emphasis on librarians, libraries and users of social science information in libraries and information centers, including the following subject areas:

  • Anthropology
  • Business
  • Communication Studies
  • Criminal Justice
  • Education
  • Ethnic Studies
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Social Work
  • Sociology
  • Women’s Studies

And including the following areas of focus:

  • Assessment
  • Publishing trends
  • Technology
  • User behavior
  • Public service
  • Indexing and abstracting
  • Collection Development and evaluation
  • Library Administration/management
  • Reference and library instruction
  • Descriptive/critical analysis of information resources

Please consider Behavioral & Social Sciences Librarian as the journal for your publication.

The journal’s website includes Instructions to Authors at:
https://tandfonline.com/toc/wbss20/current

Posted in Calls and Requests, Scholarly Publishing | No Comments »